Durban Delegates Kick Can Down The Road

Durban Delegates Kick Can Down The Road

Originally published on TheDailyCaller.com 12/13/11 – Among the thousands gathered in Durban, South Africa, for the just-concluded climate confab were dozens of law students and law professors from the United States. At the risk of offending fellow environmentalist law professors, Professor Karl Coplan questioned, on Pace University’s GreenLaw, the logic of working to reduce carbon […]

A Pipeline for Energy Independence

A Pipeline for Energy Independence

With all the focus on the controversy over the Keystone XL pipeline that would bring Canadian oil to Texas refineries, Gregg Easterbrook made the case in yesterday’s New York Times for a pipeline to bring Alaskan natural gas to the lower 48.  Natural gas from Alaska will help achieve greater independence from Middle Eastern and […]

Looking Back at 66 and 67

Looking Back at 66 and 67

Have you been wondering about the effects of Oregon’s Measures 66 and 67 adopted by voters in 2009?  Bill Valentine, writing on Oregon Catalyst, reports on some of those effects.  No surprise, but they are not what the supporters of the two tax increases claimed they would be.

A Rap to the Endangered Light Bulb

A Rap to the Endangered Light Bulb

For those depressed about the looming demise of the incandescent light bulb, this video rap might lift your spirits.

Stop Subsidizing the 1%

Stop Subsidizing the 1%

The President is hell bent on higher taxes for the rich, notwithstanding that the top 1% of earners now pay 40% of all federal income taxes.  According to Stephen Moore and Walter Williams, writing in today’s Wall Street Journal, doing what the President wants would reduce the federal deficit by only 6%, and that’s assuming […]

On Time and on Budget

On Time and on Budget

Dave Lister reminds us, in his latest column for The Oregonian, that government bureaucrats sometimes get it right, even after they have been fired.  Dean Marriott, head of Portland’s environmental services, brought the Big Pipe project in “on time and on budget, something rarely achieved in public works, . . . [while ensuring] a dramatically […]

Obama Says No to Job Creating Investment by AT&T

Obama Says No to Job Creating Investment by AT&T

The Obama administration has rejected AT&T’s proposed merger with T-Mobile on the grounds that it is anti-competitive and will result in a loss of jobs.  Nick Schulz, writing for Forbes and published by the American Enterprise Institute argues that the administration is wrong on both counts.  According to Schulz, opposition to the merger is just […]

The Filibuster Blame Game

The Filibuster Blame Game

Earlier this week Senate Republicans blocked President Obama’s nomination of Caitlin Halligan to the District of Columbia Circuit Court of Appeals.  The President, not surprisingly, is outraged.  He responded that Halligan’s nomination “fell victim to the Republican pattern of obstruction” and that the 54-45 vote for cloture (60 votes are required) “dramatically lowers the bar” […]

The Carbon Footprint of a Trip to Durban

The Carbon Footprint of a Trip to Durban

Thousands have gathered in Durban, South Africa, for ongoing negotiations in pursuit of an international treaty on climate change.  The idea is to find ways to reduce everyone’s carbon footprint.  GreenLaw blogger Karl Coplan suggests [here] that the carbon footprint of working to reduce the carbon footprint is very large.  How well are we teaching […]

Reining in the Regulators

Reining in the Regulators

The U.S. House of Representatives will soon vote on the Regulatory Accountability Act designed to give Congress greater control over the vast federal bureaucracy.  The New York Times doesn’t like it [see here], so there are probably some good things in the Act.  For a description of the key elements of the Act, see this […]

On Mismeasuring Income Inequality

On Mismeasuring Income Inequality

A Congressional Budget Office report states that “the share of income received by the top 1% grew from about 8% in 1979 to over 17% in 2007.  On the basis of data like this, protesters against income inequality have been occupying public parks all across the country.  Writing to today’s Wall Street Journal, Alan J. […]

Ignoring Constitutional Limits

Ignoring Constitutional Limits

Ilya Shapiro, a senior fellow in constitutional studies at the Cato Institute, offers [here] his nominees for the top ten Obama Administration constitutional violations in today’s Daily Caller.  Of course, Obamacare tops the list, and the sad truth is that there are many more actions that might have made the list.

Regulation Means Fewer Jobs at Carl’s Jr.

Regulation Means Fewer Jobs at Carl’s Jr.

Last week we linked to a City Journal commentary on the costs to business development and job creation of federal regulations.  In today’s Oregonian, George Will provides a concrete example of the impacts of regulation on Carl’s Jr., a company that employs 70,000 people and could employ a lot more.

Heavy Hand of Governor Looms Over Education

Heavy Hand of Governor Looms Over Education

ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED ON OREGONLIVE.COM 12/01/11 – When John Kitzhaber graduated from South Eugene High School in 1965, his goal was to attend Dartmouth College, where his father once taught. Unfortunately, his C average as a self-described unmotivated student didn’t qualify him for the school of his choice. Instead, he had to attend the University of […]

Science Compromised to Politics in Climate Change Debate

Science Compromised to Politics in Climate Change Debate

In today’s Wall Street Journal, Daniel Botkin makes an eloquent plea for the restoration of good science and the scientific method among scientists and for an understanding of the proper role of science in public policy debates among politicians and commentators.

Creating Jobs by Deregulation

Creating Jobs by Deregulation

Writing in City Journal (reprinted here by AEI), Ian Murray observes that “in the seemingly endless debate about how to put Americans back to work, one solution dare not speak its name: deregulation.”  In the same piece, Professor David Schoenbrod explains that the problem is not that Congress writes too many regulations, but that Congress sits […]

$7.7 trillion Congress didn’t know about

$7.7 trillion Congress didn’t know about

The Daily Caller reports on Federal Reserve loans totalling $7.77 trillion made without Congress’ knowledge.  So who’s running the country?

Gaining the Conservative Vote

Gaining the Conservative Vote

Writing for Townhall.com, Michael Medved challenges the widespread view among conservatives that the GOP has failed because it has too often nominated RINOs (Republicans in Name Only) for public office.  John McCain, reports Medved, did better among conservatives than did George W. Bush.  McCain fell short with moderates.  Maybe Medved has a point.  (Medved’s commentary […]

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